Blood-brain Barrier Permeability

The Blood-brain barrier (BBB) is composed of a network of vessels that form a structural and chemical barrier between the brain and systemic circulation. Vessels of the BBB are composed of specialized endothelial cells that lack fenestration (pores that allow rapid exchange of molecules between vessels and tissue), have few pinocytic vesicles to minimize uptake of extracellular substances, and have extensive tight junctions that severely restrict cell permeability. Limited permeability restricts movement of substances from the systemic circulation to the brain which buffers the brain from rapid changes in ionic or metabolic conditions. Limited BBB permeability also protects the brain from exposure to molecules that are harmless to peripheral organs but toxic to neurons in the brain. BBB permeability is influenced by neurons, the extracellular matrix, and non-neuronal cells including astrocytes, pericytes, and vascular endothelial cells. These cells, along with the extracellular matrix, function as a neurovascular unit to regulate BBB permeability and maintain the integrity and function of the central nervous system.

Sino Biological lists the classification tree of Blood-brain Barrier Permeability, click to see all the related molecules/targets and research reagents of them.

Blood-brain Barrier Permeability

Blood-brain Barrier Permeability

Adhesion Molecules

Adhesion Molecules

Focal Adhesions

Focal Adhesions

Kinases Localized to Focal Adhesions

Kinases Localized to Focal Adhesions

Phosphatases Localized to Focal Adhesions

Phosphatases Localized to Focal Adhesions

Blood-brain Barrier Transporters

Blood-brain Barrier Transporters

Cytoskeletal Filaments and Associated Proteins

Cytoskeletal Filaments and Associated Proteins

Intermediate Filaments

Intermediate Filaments

Endothelial Cell Differentiation Markers

Endothelial Cell Differentiation Markers

Extracellular Matrix and Related Molecules

Extracellular Matrix and Related Molecules

Heme Metabolism

Heme Metabolism